BURNT CORN, ALABAMA

Robert Joel Mosley

Robert Joel Mosley, Sr. served as a soldier and committeeman during the American Revolution. After the American Revolution, Robert Joel moved to Wilkes County, Georgia where he opened a plantation near Fishing Creek. His son, Robert Joel, Jr. moved ot Milledgeville, GA prior to 1807. After the Creek Indian War of 1812-1814, he, along with many other Georgians, moved into the Mississippi Territory to a place was called Burnt Corn. His first wife, Rachel Riddle, died in 1824 and was buried in what later called the Fowler Cemetary (believed to be in the Bermuda vicinity.)

In 1820, Burnt Corn was in Conecuh County. The census that year showed, in the Mosley household, 2 males over 21, males under age 21 were 2, slaves were 1. Sometime before the year 1840 Robert Joel moved to Kemper County, Mississippi. It is thought that he recieved a land grant of his service during the Creek Indian wars. He served with the Monroe County militia, commanded by Colonel Samuel Dale. Robert Joel, II died in Kemper, Mississippi in 1860.

His brother, Richard Riddle Mosley, never left Burnt Corn. He married Nancy Elizabeth Lett, the daughter of Edward and Elizabeth E. Crook Lett. Richard Riddle and Nancy E. Mosley were the parent of six children. Richard owned a large plantation on the Burnt Corn-Bermuda Road (The Federal Road). During the War Between the States he served as a Colonel in the Alabama State Militia (home guards). They had seven children, one infant drowned in a rain barrel.

Edward Lett Mosley married mary Howard Watkins, the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. John Watkins. They are buried in the Bethany Baptist Church.

Sources: Dora Mosley David and Anne Walker


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